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Holodomor Research and Education Consortium
Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies
University of Alberta
Holodomor Research and Education Consortium
Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies
University of Alberta

The Holodomor Research and Education Consortium (HREC)

 promotes the research, study, and understanding of the Holodomor – the Famine in Ukraine of 1932-33. HREC was established in 2013 by the Temerty Foundation at the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (CIUS), University of Alberta. The HREC mandate is carried out by staff in a Toronto office, CIUS staff in Edmonton, and researchers in Ukraine.

Announcements

OUR DIVISIONS

The HREC Research component conducts and promotes research on the Holodomor and related topics and engages scholars and institutions across disciplines through conferences, grants competitions, fellowships, translation and publication programs, and other outreach activities.

The HREC Education component furthers the research, study, and teaching of the Holodomor through six streams: resource development, educator training workshops, presentations, outreach, promotion, and consulting. HREC ED promotes the inclusion of the Holodomor in curricula and at educational institutions through a multidisciplinary approach that encourages the development of critical and historical thinking skills. HREC ED develops instructional materials and trains educators across Canada, the USA, and Ukraine in best practices for teaching the Holodomor and works with ministries of education, school boards, administrators, and history and social studies curriculum leaders across Canada.

About HREC

HREC/CIUS Publications

Eternal Memory: Monuments and Memorials of the Holodomor

In Eternal Memory: Monuments and Memorials of the Holodomor, Wiktoria Kudela-Świątek provides an in-depth examination of “places of memory” associated with the Great Famine of 1932–33 in Ukraine, supplemented by photographs from across the globe that highlight both the uniqueness of individual monuments and their commonalities The author investigates the history, aesthetics, and symbolism of a wide array of commemorative spaces, including museums, commemorative plaques, and sites directly linked with the victims of the Holodomor (previously unmarked mass graves, for example) The book not only illuminates the range of meanings that communities of memory have invested in these sites but sheds light on the processes by which commemorative practices have evolved and been shared between Ukraine and the diaspora
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Eternal Memory: Monuments and Memorials of the Holodomor

Holodomor in Ukraine, the Genocidal Famine 1932-1933: Learning Materials for Teachers and Students

A new comprehensive teaching resource authored by Valentina Kuryliw, Director of Education for the Holodomor Research and Education Consortium, entitled Holodomor in Ukraine, the Genocidal Famine 1932-1933: Learning Materials for Teachers and Students is now available for educators and the general public Targeted at educators teaching students in primary and secondary schools, it features stand-alone teaching materials, lesson plans and assignments with straightforward, sensible and basic information about the Famine As one of the genocides recognized by the Canadian government, it was covered up, denied and ignored for over five decades
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Holodomor in Ukraine, the Genocidal Famine 1932-1933: Learning Materials for Teachers and Students

Special thematic issue “Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries,” East/West Journal of Ukrainian Studies

Vol 8, no 1 (Spring 2021) of  East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies (EWJUS) is a special thematic issue, titled “Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
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Special thematic issue “Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries,” East/West Journal of Ukrainian Studies

In the World of Stalinist Crimes: Ukraine in the Years of the Purges and Terror (1934‒1938) from the Polish Perspective

Robert Kuśnierz's book addresses Soviet Ukraine during the Stalinist purges and Great Terror of 1934–38 as seen from the perspective of Polish diplomats then working there What sets it apart from other studies of the Great Terror is its extensive use of hitherto unknown archival materials, including documents prepared by the interwar Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Polish Army Kuśnierz describes the conditions under which the Polish consulates in Soviet Ukraine functioned during the Great Terror; the kinds of problems their officials encountered and what sources of information they used for their reports; whether they tried to intervene to prevent Soviet persecution, particularly of Polish citizens and members of the Polish minority in Soviet Ukraine; and whether the reports they transmitted to Warsaw influenced Polish policies vis-à-vis Moscow
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In the World of Stalinist Crimes: Ukraine in the Years of the Purges and Terror (1934‒1938) from the Polish Perspective